Friday, December 03, 2010

Charles Frederick Lindauer I (1836-1921) of Lindauer & Co., tobacconist


Charles Frederick Lindauer I (1836-1921) of Lindauer & Co., tobacconist. Charles and his brother Louis Julius Lindauer (1838-1915) operated tobacco stores in Hoboken, Jersey City and Manhattan, that made and sold cigars. They also used the stores for their numbers racket. In 1894 he was outed by the Lexow Commission as a minor player in the numbers racket and he used the opportunity to retire and he moved to a mansion in Rye, New York.

"Jersey City, June 1, 1889. August Mueller, who was the collector in this city for Lindauer & Co., tobacconist, was sent to jail this morning for contempt of court. His employers were dissatisfied with his returns and had a receiver appointed to examine his accounts. Mueller refused to surrender his books and his arrest followed."

Source: Newark Sunday Call; June 2, 1889

Thursday, September 30, 2010

Ben & Jack's Steakhouse for a surreal dinner

I ate at Ben & Jack's Steakhouse tonight in what was the most surreal dinner I have attended in my life. It was a medical seminar attended by Manhattan physicians and scientists. They seemed like they were in a scripted TV situation comedy, only this was a seminar with a distinguished speaker. ... The side dishes were served family style. A Korean physician to my left, Dr. Lee, wouldn't give up her used salad plate when the waiter came, despite him trying to take it twice. She wore bright blue eye shadow, the way women wore makeup in the 1970s. I soon found out why she needed it, she piled all the food onto her plates from the dishes of potato and spinach that were circulating. Since she was on my left, no food was coming from that direction, and her plate was now overflowing with the delicious pan fried potatoes with sautéed onions. And in the middle of the seminar during the discussion of extrapyramidal symptoms caused by neuroleptics, she screamed at an attendee across from her for asking a question of the speaker: "You do this all the time with the questions, why can't you just be quiet. You are so impatient, always with the questions." The speaker said that she welcomed questions, and the reason she was there was to answer any questions we had. Lee again said in a bellowing voice that brought an instant hush to the room: "Why does she have to ask questions, why can't she wait till the end." This time the speaker took a long sip from her wine glass, looked around the room, let out an audible sigh.


Since no side dishes were coming from my left, I concentrated on my right. The situation wasn't much better, a mother-daughter pair of Russian physicians were there. The older one took her steak and put in a plastic bag she brought and stuffed it into her pocket book. My steak came and was served a special way. They tilt the plate so the fat and juices run to the edge and then move the meat to your plate. The Russian woman to my right shouted out: "Why does he get such service, who is he ... Tsar?" Again this is mid seminar on a serious topic for continuing education credits.The speaker was about half a meter away, we were at the end of the table and the projection screen was less than a meter away. Then she stuck her fork into my meat on my plate and said: "Let me try Tsar's food" and she absconded with a chunk of my sirloin. About 5 minutes later she shouted as loud as she could to no one in particular, but hoping a waiter would hear her: "We need potatoes, no more potatoes here. Everyone else have potatoes but we have none." The speaker stopped and looked for her wine glass but it was already empty. She stared straight ahead at the wall, and was biting her lip. She started to talk again but was silenced by the apparatchik on my right: "I need potato, everyone else have potato. I want potato." This time it was directed at the waiter in charge of drinks, he gave her the finger to the lips, the universal sign to be quiet, and she stopped shouting.


I looked to my left and that woman, Dr. Lee, as the man to her left called her, was taking the bottle of steak sauce and putting it into her pocketbook. She was also moving all the food she had hoarded into a takeout container they had given her.


At least there was dessert to look forward to since I wasn't getting any creamed spinach or potatoes. Only dessert was a worse nightmare. Like a nightmare inside a nightmare, only there was no Leonardo DiCaprio to shock me out of it like in the movie Inception. Dr. Lee was taking the entire plate of family style desserts and loading them into a second takeout container, two pieces of chocolate cheesecake and a piece of apple strudel and a piece of regular cheesecake and a wad of whipped cream designed for eight people to share. To my right my only hope was that the Russians would feel pity for me. They took the chocolate cheesecakes and all the whipped cream. All of it. That left the strudel for me, but no whipped cream. They also had a strategy for seconds, they said they didn't get any dessert to the waiter, who looked down at their used dessert plates and just said "uh-huh". As I was leaving he was bringing them one more helping to share.


As I was leaving I went up to the speaker and apologized. She had gotten her glass of wine refilled. I said: "That was the rudest audience I have every seen, you were amazingly patient." All she could say was "No shit!"

Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Jimbo Wales and Lucy Nolan and Wikipedia

It looks like I made Jimbo Wales, the creator of Wikipedia, mad today. I have always respected him, and I am a top contributor to Wikipedia. But I noticed the Jimbo Wales was nominating the article on Lucy Nolan, the TV reporter, in Wikipedia for deletion. In 2008 he was involved in edits in the article of a woman he was dating, Rachel Marsden, of Fox TV. He announced the end of their relationship on his Wikipedia page. In retaliation, she put his t-shirt and sweater he had left at her place up for sale on eBay. I wrote on the discussion page for the Lucy Nolan article: "Does this presage more underwear on Ebay? Just wondering." Giving it some thought, I deleted it. Wales noticed anyway and he emailed me: "That's disgusting. For the record, I do not know Lucy Nolan and have had no contact or communication with her about this issue. You should be ashamed of yourself, really."

Wednesday, September 22, 2010

Marion Lattin Dilthey and Jarvis Andrew Lattin (1853-1941) and Aaron Stern in the St. Petersburg Times on April 15, 1977

Julia Marion Poole Dilthey (1910-2005) and Jarvis Andrew Lattin (1853-1941) and Aaron Stern (1876-?) in the St. Petersburg Times on April 15, 1977

Last Sunday’s story about Stern’s pickle works in Farmingdale, NY, is of particular interest to Mrs. Marion Dilthey of Pinellas Park. She was born in Farmingdale, and lived there many years, and her grandfather,Jarvis Lattin was a partner of Aaron Stern, who built the pickle works in the late 1800s. The plant in-fact, is on land which was owned by Jarvis Lattin.

Jarvis Andrew Lattin (1853-1941) in the Daytona Beach Morning Journal on December 4, 1936

Jarvis Andrew Lattin (1853-1941) in the Daytona Beach Morning Journal on December 4, 1936

Lattin Trial Later. Jarvis Lattin who was arrested yesterday on a charge of assault against his wife in their Lake Helen home Monday afternoon will not tried until his health has improved considerably, ... Lattin was removed from the county jail this afternoon to the DeLand Memorial hospital on recommendation of his physician, Dr. Hugh West. The 84-year-old retired banker is reported to be suffering from acute alcoholism.

Saturday, September 11, 2010

September 11, 2001 remembrances on 9th anniversary


September 11, 2001 remembrances on 9th anniversary.

For September 11, 2001 I was in Baltimore, Maryland at the Society for Bimolecular Screening (SBS) trade show. I was working for ASDI at the time. I heard from the woman in the booth next to mine that her mother had called her to tell her that a plane had just hit the World Trade Center ...

I drove a group of people back to New Jersey, Sophia Liang from Aurora Biomed in Vancouver and her father. They had a booth at the trade show and their next appointment was with Bristol Meyers Squibb in Princeton.

A short time later I went to Ground Zero with a woman I knew from the Internet, Judy Lanza (1959- ) and I took photos and collected some ash that I now keep in an amber jar.

Thursday, September 02, 2010

Contacts quota limit in Gmail limits the use for enterprise

It looks like Google's Gmail has a quota limit for the number of contacts you can add, which seriously limits it as an enterprise tool. It looks like the limit is 8,000 contacts. Once you reach it its stops you from adding new information and adding new people. I guess you have to start axing people from your contact list. I hope you delete the right people. Anyway, I can see why businesses avoid Gmail and stick to the old school software where you can save till you run out of hard drive space. I think I add about 2K contacts a year. A good trade show will give me over 1,000 contacts, and as many as 2K contacts per show.

Friday, August 27, 2010

Picasa vs. Flickr

Why does Google's Picasa web Albums still lag behind Flickr in versatility? In Flickr I can adjust the date for an image in a field. This is especially important when I scan an historical image. I want the date to be the date the image was taken, not the date that it was scanned that Google takes from the meta data. Flickr also lets me sort the images in any folder by the date. This adds utility to any folder. I can watch myself age as I progress through images of my youth to my current age. Scanned articles are now in chronological order. Flickr also has flexibility in the date fields for historical images so I can just pick a year, or just a month and a year. There is also a "circa" box I can check to let someone in the future know that there is uncertainty built into the date.

Tuesday, August 17, 2010

Wachovia gift card ripoff



What a ripoff a Wachovia gift card is. The person giving it to you pays cash for it, but after 12 months Wachovia charges you $2.50 a month as a service fee and deducts it from the card until all the money on the card is taken back by Wachovia. Why would you need to have a service fee if you are not using any service? Well, the answer is: so Wachovia can keep all the money on the card. I love laissez faire economics. There is also no telephone number on the card, and no easy access from the website to check the balance on the card. If you have $100 on the card, and the purchase is $107 with tax, the purchase gets declined. Ideally it would take the $100 on the card and the register would say that you owe $7 in cash. The only reason to not do that is to make it hard to use the card so that the $2.50 monthly fee starts to kick in.

Saturday, August 14, 2010

Windows Vista problem with Switch User

I am running Windows Vista and I still have the problem that when you try to switch between user accounts the computer just goes to a black screen, and the only way to get control of the computer back is to do a hard reboot by switching the computer off then on again. I have searched forums and found other users with the same problem but no solution, I thought that one of the updates would have taken care of it by now. The Microsoft help forum acknowledges the problem and says that is caused by third party software. It offers no solution ... or hope.

Friday, August 06, 2010

Thomas Patrick Norton II (1920- ) resume circa 1952-1954

Thomas P. Norton
268 Gorden Drive
Paramus, New Jersey
Oradel 8-6233 R
Office Manager
______________

Currently employed as Office Manager at Mutual Chemical Company of America, Jersey City Works, with twelve years of diversified management and executive experience in continuous-type, heavy-chemical, industrial plant of 350 employees. Responsible for Tímekeeping and Payroll, Plant Accounting Department and related Office Services with particular emphasis on Burroughs Machine Accounting, Office Systems and Cost Control.

I have a thorough knowledge of all Burroughs Accounting Machine Operations including: Unit and dual plan payroll writing; cost distribution; accounts payable (voucher register and cash disbursements); accounts receivable; stores inventory control; general ledger posting; billing; and equipment history records for maintenance control. My experience includes operations on the Burroughs 7200, 7800 and Sensimatic machines.
I am experienced in Personnel Administration including: wage and salary programs; union contract negotiations (with evaluation of union demands and interpretation in cents per hour); welfare plans (group insurance, hospitalization and pension programs); wage and employment surveys; employment and medical record keeping; plant safety program. I have had limited experience in employee interviews, recruitment, screening and hiring of new employees.
I have a working knowledge of Purchasing and Storeskeeping including: placing of bids, purchase orders and contracts; conducting price and market surveys; controlling maximum and minimum on hand quantities for a six thousand item maintenance stores inventory; conducting cyclic, periodic and reorder inventories.
I am also experienced in the flow of work from the origination of the purchase requisition through the passing of the invoice for payment.
I have had some experience in Traffic and Shipping; including domestic and export freight movement; receiving and warehousing.
I have worked with one of the leading management consultant firms in reorganizing our entire office progress; including the installation of a standard cost system.
I am interested in obtaining a position with a progressive organization as Office Manager or Assistant Office Manager, Burroughs Accounting Machine Supervisor or Administrative Assistant to the Plant Manager or Controller.
Chronological history of employment with Mutual Chemical of America

1/23/50 to date Office Manager as described on page one. I report directly to the Controller.
9/1/48 to 1/22/50 Assistant Office Manager (Generally the same as above but reported to the Office Manager) Did not hire new office employees.
12/30/46 to 8/31/48 Paymaster. Supervised Timekeeping and Payroll Departments.
4/1/46 to 12/29/46 Payroll Supervisor. Supervised Payroll Department only.
12/8/45 to 3/31/46 Production Clerk. Maintained all production records, calculated yields, throughputs and department volumes; issued reports on all phases of production. Reported to the Production Superintendent.
6/22/42 to 9/25/45
United States Navy Service. Honorable Discharge.
2/28/41 to 6/21/42
Traffic Clerk. Rated, routed and dispatched all outbound shipments. Handled routine claims for loss or damage. Paid freight bills on both inbound and outbound shipments. Maintained raw material receipts and finished goods shipped reports. Reported to the Traffic Manager.
History of prior employment

1938 to 1940 Traffic Clerk. Eagle Printing Ink Company, 165 Gates Avenue, Jersey City, New Jersey.
Education

1933 to 1937 Graduate of Henry Snyder High School, Jersey City, New Jersey.
1937 to 1938 International Correspondence School. Course in "Railway Mail Clerk".
1939 to 1940 LaSalle Institute. Course in “Traffic Management”.
1943t o 1944 United States Armed Forces Institute. Course in "Traffic Management”.
1946 to 1948 New York University. Selected courses in Management, including: "Business Organization and Management","Office Management", "Traffic and Shipping" and “Purchasing and Storeskeeping".
1952 to date International Accountants Society. Presently taking ninety assignment course in "Accounting” with emphasis on Standard Costs.
I am also a member, through my company, of the American Management Association, Office Management Division; Society for the Advancement of Management, Northern New Jersey Chapter; Jersey City Industrial Forum; Rutgers University Extension Division; and the Jersey City Executives Club and take full advantage of the educational features of these organizations by attending as many lectures, forums, seminars and meetings as is possible.
Personal information
Born July 8, 1920 in Jersey City, New Jersey. United States Citizen. Married. Have two children. Own my own home.
References

  • Mr. Jerome Dahan, Plant. Manager, Mutual Chemical Company of America, 201West Side Avenue, Jersey City 5, New Jersey.
  • Horace Walton, Controller, Mutual Chemical Company of America, 279 Madison Avenue, New York 16, New York.
  • Mr. William J. Mackay, Treasurer, Mutual Chemical Company of' America, 270 Madison Avenue, New York 16, New York.
  • Russell E. Stevens, Jr., Operations Manager New England Division of the Allstate Insurance Company, Regional Office, 10 Commerce Court, Newark 2, New Jersey. Formerly Office Manager at Mutual Chemical Company of America, Jersey City Works and my immediate superior for, three years.
  • Mr. Michael J. Noonan, Personnel Director, Universal-Rundle Corporation, River Road, Camden, New Jersey. Formerly Personnel Manager at Mutual Chemical Company of America, Jersey City Works and my associate for some five years.
  • Mr. George Street, Sales Supervisor, Burroughs Adding Machine Company, 92 Washington Street, Newark, New Jersey.
  • Mr. Arthur Winter, Salesman, Burroughs Adding Machine Company, 4 Foye Place, Jersey City, New Jersey.
Source: Thomas Patrick Norton III (1920- ) resume circa 1952-1954

Thursday, August 05, 2010

Thomas Patrick Norton II (1920-2011) resume circa 1952-1954

Thomas P. Norton
268 Gorden Drive
Paramus, New Jersey
Oradel 8-6233 R
Office Manager
______________
Currently employed as Office Manager at Mutual Chemical Company of America, Jersey City Works, with twelve years of diversified management and executive experience in continuous-type, heavy-chemical, industrial plant of 350 employees. Responsible for Tímekeepíng and Payroll, Plant Accounting Department and related Offíce Services with particular emphasis on Burroughs Machine Accounting, Office Systems and Cost Control. I have a thorough knowledge of all Burroughs Accounting Machine Operations including: Unit and dual plan payroll writing; cost distribution; accounts payable (voucher register and cash disbursements); accounts receivable; stores inventory control; general ledger posting; billing; and equipment history records for maintenance control. My experience includes operations on the Burroughs 7200, 7800 and Sensimatíc machines.
I am experienced in Personnel Administration including: wage and salary programs; union contract negotiations (with evaluation of union demands and interpretation in cents per hour); welfare plans (group insurance, hospitalization and pension programs); wage and employment surveys; employment and medical record keeping; plant safety program. I have had limited experience in employee interviews, recruitment, screening and hiring of new employees.
I have a working knowledge of Purchasing and Storeskeepíng including: placing of bids, purchase orders and contracts; conducting price and market surveys; controlling maximum and minimum on hand quantities for a six thousand item maintenance stores inventory; conducting cyclic, periodic and reorder inventories.
I am also experienced in the flow of work from the origination of the purchase requisition through the passing of the invoice for payment.
I have had some experience in Traffic and Shipping; including domestic and export freight movement; receiving and warehousing.
I have worked with one of the leading management consultant firms in reorganizing our entire office progress; including the installation of a standard cost system.
I am interested in obtaining a position with a progressive organization as Office Manager or Assistant Office Manager, Burroughs Accounting Machine Supervisor or Administrative Assistant to the Plant Manager or Controller.
Source: Thomas Patrick Norton III (1920- ) resume circa 1952-1954

Thomas Patrick Norton III (1920-2011) resume circa 1952-1954



Thomas P. Norton
268 Gorden Drive
Paramus, New Jersey
Oradel 8-6233 R
Office Manager
______________
Currently employed as Office Manager at Mutual Chemical Company of America, Jersey City Works, with twelve years of diversified management and executive experience in continuous-type, heavy-chemical, industrial plant of 350 employees. Responsible for Tímekeepíng and Payroll, Plant Accounting Department and related Offíce Services with particular emphasis on Burroughs Machine Accounting, Office Systems and Cost Control. I have a thorough knowledge of all Burroughs Accounting Machine Operations including: Unit and dual plan payroll writing; cost distribution; accounts payable (voucher register and cash disbursements); accounts receivable; stores inventory control; general ledger posting; billing; and equipment history records for maintenance control. My experience includes operations on the Burroughs 7200, 7800 and Sensimatíc machines.
I am experienced in Personnel Administration including: wage and salary programs; union contract negotiations (with evaluation of union demands and interpretation in cents per hour); welfare plans (group insurance, hospitalization and pension programs); wage and employment surveys; employment and medical record keeping; plant safety program. I have had limited experience in employee interviews, recruitment, screening and hiring of new employees.
I have a working knowledge of Purchasing and Storeskeepíng including: placing of bids, purchase orders and contracts; conducting price and market surveys; controlling maximum and minimum on hand quantities for a six thousand item maintenance stores inventory; conducting cyclic, periodic and reorder inventories.
I am also experienced in the flow of work from the origination of the purchase requisition through the passing of the invoice for payment.
I have had some experience in Traffic and Shipping; including domestic and export freight movement; receiving and warehousing.
I have worked with one of the leading management consultant firms in reorganizing our entire office progress; including the installation of a standard cost system.
I am interested in obtaining a position with a progressive organization as Office Manager or Assistant Office Manager, Burroughs Accounting Machine Supervisor or Administrative Assistant to the Plant Manager or Controller.
Source: Thomas Patrick Norton III (1920- ) resume circa 1952-1954
Thomas P. Norton

268 Gorden Drive
Paramus, New Jersey
Oradel 8-6233 R
Office Manager
______________
Currently employed as Office Manager at Mutual Chemical Company of America, Jersey City Works, with twelve years of diversified management and executive experience in continuous-type, heavy-chemical, industrial plant of 350 employees. Responsible for Tímekeepíng and Payroll, Plant Accounting Department and related Offíce Services with particular emphasis on Burroughs Machine Accounting, Office Systems and Cost Control. I have a thorough knowledge of all Burroughs Accounting Machine Operations including: Unit and dual plan payroll writing; cost distribution; accounts payable (voucher register and cash disbursements); accounts receivable; stores inventory control; general ledger posting; billing; and equipment history records for maintenance control. My experience includes operations on the Burroughs 7200, 7800 and Sensimatíc machines.
I am experienced in Personnel Administration including: wage and salary programs; union contract negotiations (with evaluation of union demands and interpretation in cents per hour); welfare plans (group insurance, hospitalization and pension programs); wage and employment surveys; employment and medical record keeping; plant safety program. I have had limited experience in employee interviews, recruitment, screening and hiring of new employees.
I have a working knowledge of Purchasing and Storeskeepíng including: placing of bids, purchase orders and contracts; conducting price and market surveys; controlling maximum and minimum on hand quantities for a six thousand item maintenance stores inventory; conducting cyclic, periodic and reorder inventories.
I am also experienced in the flow of work from the origination of the purchase requisition through the passing of the invoice for payment.
I have had some experience in Traffic and Shipping; including domestic and export freight movement; receiving and warehousing.
I have worked with one of the leading management consultant firms in reorganizing our entire office progress; including the installation of a standard cost system.
I am interested in obtaining a position with a progressive organization as Office Manager or Assistant Office Manager, Burroughs Accounting Machine Supervisor or Administrative Assistant to the Plant Manager or Controller.
Source: Thomas Patrick Norton III (1920- ) resume circa 1952-1954

Wednesday, August 04, 2010

Wedding of Ralph Freudenberg (1903-1980) to Wladyslawa Joan Dombrowska (1916-1995)

Wedding of Ralph Freudenberg (1903-1980) to Wladyslawa Joan Dombrowska (1916-1995) in 1964. Image from the collection of Burnett Peter Van Deusen (1913-1993) scanned by Mark Andrew Dahl (1970- ) in 2010.

Tuesday, August 03, 2010

Anthony Falletta, Jr. (1965-2010)



Anthony Falletta, Jr. (1965-2010) died in a car accident along the Garden State Parkway. (b. January 18, 1965; Paterson, New Jersey - August 2, 2010; AtlantiCare Regional Medical Center, Pomona, New Jersey)

Obituary:
Anthony Falletta Jr, age 45 of Island Heights, passed away Monday, August 2nd at AtlantiCare Regional MedicalCenter. Born in Paterson, he was raised in Jefferson Township, lived in Hamilton Square before moving to Island Heights six years ago. He was employed as a Project Superintendent for The Earle Companies in Wall Township. He was a member of United Methodist Church in Island Heights. All who knew Anthony will remember his devotion to his family wife, children, relatives, friends and people with whom he came into contact. Surviving are his wife Beth, his children Anthony Joseph "AJ" and Kristina, his parents Anthony Sr. and Phyllis of Toms River, his brother Thomas and his wife Kathleen of New Egypt, his sister Suzanne and her husband Pete of Howell, mother-in-law Joan Schwendel of Jefferson Township, brother-in-law Paul Schwendel and his wife Gina, sister-in-law Tracy Ames and her husband David along with many nieces and nephews. Visitation will be held Thursday, August 5th from 2-4 and 7-9 PM and Friday, August 6th from 9:00 AM until the Funeral Service beginning at 10:30 AM at Carmona-Bolen Home For Funerals, 412 Main Street, Toms River, NJ 08753. Cremation will be private. In lieu of flowers contributions to AJ's and Kristina's college fund are appreciated.

Friday, July 23, 2010

Frank Lennox Hebberd I (1868-1931) obituary


Hebberd - Formerly of Woodcliff-on-Hudson, N.J., at Union City, N. J., on Tuesday, October 27, 1931, Frank Lennox Hebberd, Sr., aged 65 years, husband of the late Letita (nee Arnold), and devoted father of Mrs. Grover Lindauer, Gilbert A., Frank L. Jr., Harvey and Royal Hebbert. ...

Source:
New York Times; October 29, 1931, Thursday

Friday, July 16, 2010

Why does yahoo IM still limit me to 1,000 entries in my Yahoo Instant Messenger

Why does yahoo IM still limit me to 1,000 entries in my Yahoo Instant Messenger? In this day and age when I can buy a terabyte hard drive for about $80, and GMail offers me 6 gigabytes of email storage. Why is Yahoo still being so stingy? MySpace was the leader in social networking and never changed while competitors innovated. Anyone remember MySpace?

Wednesday, July 07, 2010

Maria Elizabeth Winblad interview from August 1986 by Susan Penny Van Deusen at the Lutheran Home in Jersey City, New Jersey

video

Maria Elizabeth Winblad interview from August 1986 by Susan Penny Van Deusen at the Lutheran Home in Jersey City, New Jersey.

Penny: We thought of some questions to ask you.
Maria: Oh, you did?

Penny: Like, what year were you born in?
Maria: 1895. ... [volume too low] [unrelated conversation]

Penny: We brought a tape recorder so you can talk into it and we can listen when we get home.
Maria: Oh, well, I would say I wish you all have a nice day and a nice year in your home there, and enjoy yourself, where you can run all around in the grass with all your friends, yes, that's nice.

Penny: Christy wanted to know what your parents were like.
Maria: What they were like? Well, I will show you. Did I have the bible here? [she gets her bible] [ambient noise]

April: Hi, I am April
Penny: They wanted to know what was your mother’s name and your father’s name?
Maria: Well, my mother's name was Salmine, S-A-L-I-M-I-N-E, Salmine. See [shows name in bible bible], Selma gets her name from her. My mother did not like Salmine. ... That is a nice name, why didn't you call her Salmine ... That is the name you saw in the book, and my father's name was John, that is another John, only he was John Edward. John Edward, that was my father's name. That is another John.

Penny: How many children did they have?
Maria: Well, I think my mother had seven, but ... she raised three, three. Well, Eddie ... Eddie was only two years old. We went up the street one morning, my mother told me I could take him out. ... This little girl had whooping cough ... I guess I was eleven, was I eleven? ... They had things to drink there. Eddie and I came down with whooping cough, so the doctor said ...My brother the little fellow ... pneumonia and died. I was 4 and he was 2 ... Eddie went into pneumonia and he died. But the doctor said that there was no hope for the little girl. ... She never should have let her little girl have all those children there ... Eddie went into pneumonia and he died. Could I have a piece of bread? ... He was such a good little fellow. Daddy has the papers, that is where I will be buried., with him. Out in Greenville.

Penny: Is that in New Jersey?
Maria: New York Bay cemetery ... Daddy had paid ... that I have that grave there.

Penny: Were all of you born in the United States?
Maria: [misunderstands question] Christian ... My mother was only 2 years old when her mother died. So there he was left ... baker ... he never remarried and raised these seven children, and my mother was only 2 years old when her mother died, and he never remarried. He was a very religious man. He lived it.

Penny: What did he do for a living?
Maria: He was a baker
Maria: He was the dean of a college there [Note: He was the only school teacher, not a dean of a college. His daughter Frideborg would become the principle of the high school and the stories have become conflated and exaggerated]

Penny: What was your last name before you were married?
Maria: Winblad

Christy: Where were you born?
Maria: New York City
I was 9 months old when my father had the house built.
Apple street and a dirt road across the street and a big pasture there. They had a carriage, a two seater, it had the fringe around it [laughs], ... I would like to have a ride in one of them. He had a big pasture across the street ... one block to the other ...

Penny:Who was the youngest child and who was the oldest?
Maria: Otto was the youngest ... Tony was the oldest. Otto was 75, Tony was 88 when he died

Penny: Why did they come here?
Maria: He was on a ship when he met my mother ... They had a cleaning lady and a lady that did the cooking.

Penny: I would like to have two ladies [to help at home].
Maria: He was gone for 5 years, he ran away from college. Selma said I can't sleep ... try it for one month and I will talk to your teacher. Try it for a month. Selma. When she got the report ... I am not going to make the mistake that my father did. ... She was happy. ... He was gone 5 years and he was in Norway and must have liked her. He said he wanted her to go up to Sweden to meet his father and mother before they were married. I don't think his father was alive. [Note: his father was alive and died in 1901]... I think the father had died. He was gone for 5 years . He had four sisters and two of them were nurses, and his father wanted him to be a pastor. If my grandfather had not been so strict, he may have been a pastor. With Selma ... and she did and she got a good report.

Penny: So they came to the United States right after they were married?
Maria: ... Brides ... She washed the chicken off and put it in the oven. You can never take that back. Your supposed to take that out.

Penny: They didn’t know anyone here?
Penny: How old were you when you started school?
Maria: Number 11 school ... firehouse

Penny: Do you remember any friends from school
Maria: I remember the day I graduated

Penny: Did you go all the way to 12th grade?
Maria: [volume too low] ... My father paid $10 a month

Penny: You had to finish the course?
Maria: That bothered me

Penny: What did you do after you finished your business course?
Maria: ... Cuba ...

Penny: What did he try to do?
Maria: ... He would tell them where to put the They were in the ship in the bottom ...

Penny: Why couldn’t he stay in Cuba?
Maria: He was a man of the sea, he couldn’t make a penny there. ... It had four rooms ... four bedrooms.

Penny: How old were you?
Maria: I was 15 ... Otto and I were there a year and a half. Tony married Eva ... She lived across from us, one day a storm came up and the house blew down the road

Maria: My mother got sick down there ... her heart ... I did the washing, the ironing ... the Bronx
Penny: Why did they go to Norway?

Penny: How long were they gone over there?
Maria: They died over there.

Penny: They took Otto?
Maria: ... My aunt’s house. ...

Penny: How old were they?

[recording ends]

Transfered to a digital format by Kevin Borland in 2009. Transcribed by Richard Arthur Norton (1958- ) in 2010.

Tuesday, July 06, 2010

Alfred Ingvald Naess (1877-1955) and Nadja Frank at a skating performance on Frognerkilen bay, Oslo, Norway circa 1900-1920



Alfred Ingvald Naess (1877-1955) and Nadja Frank at a skating performance on Frognerkilen bay, Oslo, Norway circa 1900-1920.
Date: circa 1900
Source: Norsk Teknisk Museum
Photographer: Severin Worm-Petersen (1857-1933)

Tuesday, June 29, 2010

Big catch



Charles Francis Freudenberg (1910-1979) in August 1926. The photograph is labeled "Big Catch". Photograph from the collection of Ralph Freudenberg (1903-1980) and Nora Belle Conklin (1902-1963)

Thursday, June 24, 2010

Emmett Peter Van Deusen I (1878-1965) obituary

Emmett Peter Van Deusen I (1878-1965) obituary

Emmett Peter Van Deusen, 87 of 302 51st Street West Bradenton, died Saturday at Manatee Memorial Hospital. Van Deusen was born in Jefferson, New York, and came to Bradenton 13 years ago from Detroit, Michigan. He was a retired boat dealer and a member of the Horseshoe Masonic Lodge of Middletown, New York. He is survived by four sons. Lloyd B. Van Deusen of Chicago Illinois; Emmett P. Van Deusen, Jr. of Atlanta Georgia; Robert R. Fulton of Jackson Michigan and Stuart F. Fulton of Ferndale, Michigan; a daughter, Mrs. Kathryn Johnson of Mercer Island, Washington; eight grandchildren and one great grandchild. Funeral services will be held at 2 p. m. Tuesday at Shannons Bradenton chapel with the Reverend Troy Brady, pastor of the Ecumenical United Brethren Church officiating. Cremation will follow.

Source:
Sarasota Herald-Tribune; Sarasota, Florida; November 7, 1965

Wednesday, June 23, 2010

Eva Ariel Lattin (1892-1939); and Anton Julius Winblad II (1886-1975) on the Isle of Pines, Cuba circa 1912



Standing on steps between columns are from left to right are: Eva Ariel Lattin (1892-1939); and Anton Julius Winblad II (1886-1975). This photograph may show the post office in Santa Barbara on the Isle of Pines in Cuba around 1911-1914. Image from the collection of Marie Elizabeth Winblad (1895-1987).

Monday, June 21, 2010

Interview with Maria Winblad (1891-1987) in August of 1986 by Susan Penny Van Deusen at the Lutheran Home in Jersey City, New Jersey

Interview with Maria Winblad (1891-1987) in August of 1986 by Susan Penny Van Deusen at the Lutheran Home in JAdd Videoersey City, New Jersey.

Penny: We thought of some questions to ask you.
Penny: Like what year were you born in?
Maria: 1895. ...

Penny: We brought a tape recorder.
Maria: Have a nice day in and a nice year in your home there ... where you can run around in the grass with your friends

Penny: Christy wanted to know what your parents were like.
Maria: I will show you [she gets her bible] .
April: Hi, I am April

Penny: What was your mother’s name and your father’s name?
Maria: Salmine ... Selma gets her name from her. ... Salmina and my father's name was John, that is another John, John Edward. That was my father’s name.

Penny: How many children did they have?
Maria: I think my mother had seven, she raised three. We went up the street and a little girl had whooping cough and she had everyone in the yard ... we went up there and they had things to drink there. Eddie and I came down with whooping cough. The little girl there was no hope for. My brother the little fellow ... pneumonia and died. I was 4 and I think he was 2, 2 years old. They never should have let all thise children there, they had lemonade. There was no hope for the little girl. ... Eddie went into pneumonia and he died ... Like my mother said ... piece of bread ... Not Eddie ... He was such a good little fellow. Daddy has the papers that is where I will be buried.

Penny: Is that in New Jersey?
Maria: New York Bay cemetery ... Daddy had paid so that I have that grave there.

Penny: Were all of you born in the United States?
Maria: Yes. My grandparents were both Christian. My mother was only 2 years old when her mother died ... How old is your little one?
Penny: 14 months
Maria:... baker ... he never remarried and raised these seven children, and my mother was only 2 years old when her mother died, and he never remarried. He was a very religious man. He lived it.

Penny: What did he do for a living?
Maria: He was a baker

Maria: He was the dean of a college there [Note: He was the only school teacher, not a dean of a college. His daughter Frideborg would become the principle of the high school and the stories have become conflated and exaggerated]

Penny: What was your last name before you were married?
Maria: Winblad

Christy: Where were you born?
Maria: New York City ... I was 9 months old when my father had the house built.
Apple street and a dirt road across the street and a big pasture there. They had a carriage, a two seater, it had the fringe around it [laughs], ... I would like to have a ride in one of them. He had a big pasture across the street ... one block to the other ...

Penny:Who was the youngest child and who was the oldest?
Maria: Otto was the youngest ... Tony was the oldest. Otto was 75, Tony was 88 when he died.

Penny: Why did they come here?
Maria: He was on a ship when he met my mother ... They had a cleaning lady and a lady that did the cooking.
Penny: I would like to have two ladies [to help at home].
Maria: He was gone for 5 years, he ran away from college. Selma said I can't sleep ... try it for one month and I will talk to your teacher. Try it for a month. Selma. When she got the report ... I am not going to make the mistake that my father did. ... She was happy. ... He was gone 5 years and he was in Norway and must have liked her. He said he wanted her to go up to Sweden to meet his father and mother before they were married. I don't think his father was alive. [NOte: his father was alive and died in 1901]... I think the father had died. He was gone for 5 years . He had four sisters and two of them were nurses, and his father wanted him to be a pastor. If my grandfather had not been so strict, he may have been a pastor. With Selma ... and she did and she got a good report.

Penny: So they came to the United States right after they were married?
Maria: ... Brides ... She washed the chicken off and put it in the oven. You can never take that back. Your supposed to take that out.

Penny: They didn’t know anyone here?
Maria:

Penny: How old were you when you started school?
Maria: Number 11 school ... firehouse

Penny: Do you remember any friends from school?
Maria: I remember the day I graduated

Penny: Did you go all the way to 12th grade?
Maria: [inaudible, volume lowers as microphone becomes too far from the speaker] ... My father paid $10 a month

Penny: You had to finish the course?
Maria: That bothered me

Penny: What did you do after you finished your business course?
Maria: ... Cuba ...

Penny: What did he try to do?
Maria: ... He would tell them where to put the They were in the ship in the bottom ...

Penny: Why couldn’t he stay in Cuba?
Maria: He was a man of the sea, he couldn’t make a penny there. ... It had four rooms ... four bedrooms.

Penny: How old were you?
Maria: I was 15 ... Otto and I were there a year and a half. Tony married Eva ... She lived across from us, one day a storm came up and the house blew down the road
Maria: My mother got sick down there ... her heart ... I did the washing, the ironing ... the Bronx

Penny: Why did they go to Norway?
Maria:

Penny: How long were they gone over there?
Maria: They died over there.

Penny: They took Otto?
Maria: ... My aunt’s house. ...

Penny: How old were they?
[recording ends]